Keeping Your Composure at Work Even When Your Life is Falling Apart

September 30, 2022

Stressed and Depressed

Picture this. You work for a bank as a teller and your regular hours run from 9 to 5, similar to millions of other office employees. Your four-year relationship with your partner has ended and your sister just received a breast cancer diagnosis.

You should be aware by this time in your life that life isn't all rainbows and sparkles. You literally have to hustle everyday. You know that before you can enjoy the sight of rainbows, thunderstorms would pass. When things are difficult, it's simple to give up, but reality would hit you with a ton of debts to pay. The only option in the face of a personal crisis or of you literally falling apart is to keep on working.

Your greatest efforts to maintain a healthy balance between work and life may pay off in this situation. Yes, this is a really challenging period to concentrate and work well, but with the appropriate attitude and excellent habits, it's not completely impossible. Here are some pointers for managing a personal crisis while maintaining productivity at work.

Your greatest efforts to maintain a healthy balance between work and life may pay off in this situation. Yes, this is a really challenging period to concentrate and work well, but with the appropriate attitude and excellent habits, it's not completely impossible. Here are some pointers for managing a personal crisis while maintaining productivity at work.



Make sure anyone important in the office is in the know.

Of course, it is under your full discretion on how big of the parcel you are willing to share in the office, meaning how much of your problem are you willing to disclose with your coworkers. The general rule is to only share information that your office requires because it affects your presence or attendance at work. Make sure your close friend at work is trustworthy before you confide in them about your troubles.

The next step is to evaluate the work environment at your firm and choose the most effective means of communicating your issue. It's probably acceptable to disclose that you have something you are going through at home if the working culture is welcoming and transparent. Just avoid going into specifics to preserve your privacy and shield you from criticism of your work performance. It's probably ideal for you to just share the information with your HR, office manager, or direct superior if the work environment at your place of business is quite professional. You of all people know how to deal with this best since you work in your office everyday.



Say no more often.

If you are having a hard time saying no, adopt this mindset. Consider it this way: by developing your ability to say no, you will benefit both yourself and your employer. Prioritize your duties and concentrate on the tasks that are urgent and significant. If a task is not part of your job role in the first place (you should be clear about this from the very start), politely decline it. If your boss is insistent, suggest an alternative solution that won't increase your workload.

Especially in light of the fact that at this exact point in your life, you can only fulfill what is written down and cannot perform additional favors, set boundaries and adhere to them. In order to control expectations, it is usually preferable to make reasonable promises. This saves a lot of time and energy for you and your employer.



Request assistance.

Or, if you're in a position to, master delegation skills. Neither are you a superhero nor a superhuman. The truth is that you are going through a serious life crisis and are trying to keep it from affecting other aspects of your life. So don't stress yourself out and don't create more pressure. If you are able to do that and that alone, then you for sure deserve an award. Be honest with yourself and admit what you can and cannot do with compassion. Accept your limits at this time and most importantly, be kind. By asking for a deadline extension, you can subtly solicit assistance from others because the extra time may help you plan your time more effectively. You can also ask about the perks that come with being an employee, such as how your sister's hospital stay can be covered by your health insurance.

There’s no harm in asking for help. You work hard as their employee so it’s also part of their obligation to make sure that your mental health is doing fine.



Divide your effort into doable, smaller tasks.

When you have a lot of thoughts running through your head, it can be tough to concentrate and complete your work. You'll feel so exhausted and frustrated that maybe the tears will just start pouring even if it's not your break yet and everyone within near distance can see you crying. If this occurs, by all means get out of your chair, walk away from your desk, take a few deep breaths, and go outside.

You would still need to work though after your break. You must prepare in advance and divide your work into tiny, doable action steps if you want to complete your to-do list of the day. Use a whiteboard to jot down your to-do list, and try to be as detailed as you can (for example, answer five e-mails or send a brief to three other employees). Anything with a number is a good start.



Put your health first.

Even during a challenging moment, it should never cross your mind to take your health for granted. Your performance at work will undoubtedly suffer if you become ill or burn out as a result of all that is occurring in your life right now. If your health is not a top priority, you might even create another issue in your life. Allot some time to meditate and assess your wellbeing. This is for your personal benefit, yes, but it also helps the company when you are taking good care of your health.

Using a desk bike is one method of staying active. The Home office All-in-One Desk Bike/Bike Workstation (V9) from Flexispot is ideal for boosting your energy and assisting you in maintaining attention and alertness at work. Based on the level of resistance you select, you may pedal lightly or vigorously.

The key thing is that, despite your life appearing to be in disarray, you are still able to exercise.

If all else fails, take a short vacation to refresh and recharge. We hope you feel better soon! Remember that the bad days don’t last forever. Everything will be alright in time.

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